It’s bridge, Kirk, you’re just too old to remember.

June 3, 2009 at 7:15 am 18 comments

If a junior gives you a bridge hand, it’s just bound to look something like this:

sAKQ10xxx
h1AJ10987
d1
c

and of course, RHO opens 1H, what else?

So, how you do set about bidding this lot? Back tomorrow for a look at what happened at the table.

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Entry filed under: bidding.

Still on Planet Cayne…what do you lead? Warning. Kiddy playing in the middle of the street.

18 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Jonathan Mestel  |  June 3, 2009 at 8:05 pm

    Do we always make the same bid on the same hand?

    Today, I shall bid 1S. I don’t like passing because I’m not
    convinced partner will have the nerve to leave me in 6S
    later 1H-P-2D-5C; 6D-6S-P-?
    I think I’d rather try to get doubled in 5S than blast 6S.

    Here’s one I picked up a few years ago:

    KQJ98xx

    A10xxxx

    Love all. 1S-3D-6S-? 3D was weak.

    Reply
    • 2. cathychua  |  June 4, 2009 at 7:17 am

      My partner has bid my void? I pass.

      Reply
      • 3. Jonathan  |  June 4, 2009 at 5:57 pm

        Partner held xx x 98765432 Kx, and doesn’t find CK lead.
        -1010.

        I’d just picked up a sequence of balanced 5 counts and thought
        at last I was going to get to join in. But no. Now a junior would have bid 6NT like a shot.
        Good luck in the VCC whatever that is. Surely not Victoria CHESS
        championships!? J

        Reply
  • 4. jill magee  |  June 3, 2009 at 3:26 pm

    i would hesitate a long time, pick up the opponents’ system card, look incredulous, ask my LHO if the 1H opening was natural, then hesitate some more, finally i would shrug, sigh, and bid 6S.

    this convention is known as the Victorian Grand Slam Try.

    Reply
    • 5. cathychua  |  June 3, 2009 at 5:04 pm

      Trouble with that idea is that only a completely dense RHO would get it wrong what to do at trick one….

      Reply
  • 6. Ron Lel  |  June 3, 2009 at 3:22 pm

    I really don’t think that 6S is a good bid, despite the protagonists who would bid it here. If the H opening is genuine, as Bill Jacobs points out, you have 2 h losers to dispose of. I would start slowly with 1S and see what happens; after all, life is much slower here in Laos.

    Reply
  • 7. sartaj  |  June 3, 2009 at 1:24 pm

    1S. Followed by 4S and 5S, on my own.
    Need to hear some sort of good news to bid slam.

    Reply
  • 8. Bill Jacobs  |  June 3, 2009 at 12:58 pm

    In theory the problem with 6S is that you probably have 2 heart losers. Unless LHO leads one and RHO puts up an honour.

    How strong are your opponents? So much depends on trick 1.

    Also, is there a strategy for blocking out their minor suits? It’s hard to say.

    I’d probably bash 6S like the others. After all, it might just be that either partner or LHO has one of those missing heart honours.

    Reply
    • 9. cathychua  |  June 3, 2009 at 4:53 pm

      Yes, I was wondering about that. How likely are they to put up a heart honour? I was thinking in this regard, that perhaps it is important that you have all the high pips in hearts. If the opening leader got to start with some high pip it would be clear to RHO what to do. But they have to start with a low one. That’s got to make it really hard for RHO, doesn’t it?

      Or will RHO have the information to figure out that the opening leader’s hearts can’t be all that long and therefore declarer’s bid is based on just what he has….

      Reply
  • 10. Chris Mulley  |  June 3, 2009 at 11:03 am

    Maybe I’m just younger than the rest, but I haven’t yet ruled out a psychic 1H opening. Of course, exactly how I plan on diagnosing it is another matter. One thing is certain – 1H is NOT ending the bidding and I am not worried about being outbid on this hand.

    It now becomes a question for me of the opponent’s system. If they are playing 2/1 or a traditional, sound style for responding with 2m, I think I can afford to pass now and get more information. In particular, I can find out if LHO has four spades in many cases (the 1S response will tip me off). Where that happens, I don’t even want to be in 6S. If I don’t hear the dreaded 1S on my left, I will blast 6S next time … unless partner delights me by finding an attractive bid (like a takeout double).

    If the opponents are playing a looser (did I put one “o” too many in that???) style where 2m can routinely contain 4 spades and less than 10+ HCP, I guess I may as well take my shot at 6S now.

    Reply
    • 11. cathychua  |  June 3, 2009 at 4:52 pm

      Oh! Now that’s an idea, I like that. I’m not sure if you are way too young or way too old….

      Reply
  • 12. phil markey  |  June 3, 2009 at 10:38 am

    i lurk in the bushes and bid 1 spade – i like an immediate 6 spades too – you are virtually never making 7 spades and one problem with the immediate 6 spades is that you are screwed when they bid 7 of a minor

    i mean when you bid 6 spades they get that your planning on making – when 6 spades is a spread pard has some sort of spade holding and if pard has that then they have something very special too – an opponent with some massive minor and shape and no fear (AKA youth player) is a good chance to spoil the party by bidding 7

    put another way i am hopefull that bidding 1 spade they will mis-value the minor suit controls – something they shouldnt do when i bid 6 spades immediately

    hard to say where i will end up – certainly i am not selling out to 6 of a minor and my blue card is handy

    Reply
    • 13. Ben Thompson  |  June 3, 2009 at 11:00 am

      This is more a question for Cathy, I suppose.

      After 1H (6S) – is 6NT for the minors?

      Reply
      • 14. cathychua  |  June 3, 2009 at 1:57 pm

        Ben. We are not amused.

        Reply
    • 15. Chris Mulley  |  June 3, 2009 at 11:07 am

      Maybe I’m an optimist, but the wombat that partner wields at 7m might spill a lot of blood. If partner can’t bring the axe down, I will, and the opponents may well have the sort of hand where there is nothing I could ever have done to stop them from bidding 7m over 6S without running the risk of the bidding dying on me at the 4 or 5 level.

      Reply
    • 16. cathychua  |  June 3, 2009 at 5:06 pm

      One of the things that seems worthy of consideration is this: will bidding it slowly make it less likely of getting a heart lead to an honour at trick one???

      Reply
      • 17. phil markey  |  June 3, 2009 at 6:52 pm

        “One of the things that seems worthy of consideration is this: will bidding it slowly make it less likely of getting a heart lead to an honour at trick one???”

        surely someone bidding 6 spades over a 1 heart opening isnt fussed about a heart lead – a holding headed by the king seems unlikely so really a singleton heart should look a bit futile – if LHO has an ace that might appeal more or if they have scattered minor suit cards i think the usually verboten trump is going to look ok

        i think bidding it slowly is perhaps more likely to elicit a heart lead although i would be looking to my left to make sure they are thinking like i think they should be thinking

        Reply
  • 18. Ben Thompson  |  June 3, 2009 at 8:51 am

    What I really want to do is get to 7S opposite Jxxxx x xxx xxxx

    The best way to really mangle it is to bid something groovy like 3H (“got a heart stopper partner?”) intending to convert anything to 6S. Partner will then obviously figure out what’s going on and raise to 7S with the hand above.

    And that mangles it because partner really has Jxxx xx xxx xxxx. Now when you start with something groovy like 3H, partner bids spades and you wrong-side 6S and go down on a heart ruff on the opening lead.

    I bid 6S. Maybe I make, maybe I go down, but at least I’m not afraid of them sacrificing in 7H.

    Reply

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