At the five level. Four card majors

May 28, 2010 at 5:39 am 1 comment

The idea of opening four card majors is that you find out what your partnership is most likely to need to know quickly, thus bidding quickly and with minimal information exchange (ie information for the opponents to make use of) to a sensible contract.

This hand is a good example:

Board 6
Dealer East
EW Vul

NORTH

s109
h1AQJ1032
d1KQ74
c6

WEST

sAKJ742
h165
d11096
c42

EAST

sQ853
h1K4
d1A52
cKJ108

SOUTH

s6
h1987
d1J83
cAQ9753

WEST….NORTH….EAST….SOUTH
……………………1S……..Pass
4S……..5H……….Dble…..All Pass

North hasn’t any choice, has he? East can comfortably double.

In the other room:

WEST….NORTH….EAST….SOUTH
…………………….1C……..Pass
1S……..4H……….Pass…..Pass
4S……..Pass……..Pass…..5C
Pass……5H……….5S……..All Pass

5H went one down doubled and 5S drifted three down. You might criticise East’s bidding, but it had to be harder than the auction in the other room! I’d really hate to hold that East hand and never get to show 4 card support for a suit that partner has bid by himself to the four level.

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Entry filed under: bidding.

At the five level. Scottish Cup

1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Rainer Herrmann  |  May 28, 2010 at 8:40 pm

    There is no doubt that there are scenarios where 4 card major openings gain. This is one of them. Another is that they are harder to defend against in the bidding as well as during the play of the hand.
    But there are also many scenarios where 4 card major systems loose.
    The question is whether the trade-off is worthwhile.
    Hard to tell from a theoretical point of view, but when even most big clubbers nowadays try to combine 5 card majors with a strong club, the vast majority of players seem to have made up their mind.
    Some Swedish experts now believe you should not even open in a 5 card major, if your hand is balanced and in the wrong range for a notrump opening bid.

    Reply

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