A typical Seres story

January 1, 2011 at 9:47 am 3 comments

The 1966 Interstate was a year of firsts. It was the first held by the ACT and the first to have a Bridgerama final. It was also the first Open Interstate Victoria had won since 1953.

Victoria was 27 IMPs down after 45 boards of the final against NSW. They recovered to win by a handful of IMPs despite moments of nervousness like this:

NORTH 

s7542
h1Q10864
d198
cJ4

WEST 

sKQ93
h1K7
d1J73
cQ973

EAST 

sAJ108
h1AJ92
d1AKQ4
c8

SOUTH 

s6
h153
d110532
cAK10652

In the Open Room Ian McCance and Fred Altman reached only 4S. At least, though, they played the right strain. After a pyschic opening by Charlie Hickman in the other room, the auction proceeded:

WEST           NORTH           EAST          SOUTH
Howard       Hickman        Seres         Stennett
………………1C                   Dble             3C
4C                 Pass               4H         All Pass

As he waited for his parter to lead, North must have scarcely been able to believe his luck. His joy was short-lived, though. Seres squared the board by winning the spade lead and taking two rounds of trumps, finessing the nine. Next he cashed his winners and North, eventually compelled to trump, then had to lead into the  AJ tenace.

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Entry filed under: history, Tim Seres. Tags: , , .

Norma Borin Norma continued

3 Comments Add your own

  • 1. khokan  |  January 3, 2011 at 8:21 pm

    Cathy,

    It’s good to know that you’re much better now.

    As much as I hate to say it, the best thing that can be said about Tim’s line on this hand is that it was successful. A low heart to the jack seems a much better line, and will also work on the given layout – cash 4 spades and lead a club before cashing diamonds ending in dummy and ruffing a club in hand. This line doesn’t risk losing to a doubleton or tripleton 10 with south – quite likely, given the lead – and north holding the CA or CK with a doubleton diamond.

    How about the bidding, though? North psyches in a two-card minor. West bids 4C, rather than 3S, 3NT or 4S, and then passes 4H with a doubleton!!

    Reply
    • 2. cathyc  |  January 3, 2011 at 8:32 pm

      Hi Khokan. Nice to have you back too. I take your point, though perhaps Tim was simply confident from RHO’s jump to 3C (whatever that meant) that he had the top clubs…I imagine the psyching style was to have nothing rather than a bit.

      As for the bidding. Hmmm…..I think we can say it is no wonder Tim was good at taking tricks. He kind of had to be.

      Reply
  • 3. Richard09  |  January 2, 2011 at 4:29 pm

    Awesome.

    Reply

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